Trust announces volunteers of the year for The Royal Oldham Hospital and Rochdale Infirmary and names longest serving volunteer

Trust announces volunteers of the year for The Royal Oldham Hospital and Rochdale Infirmary and names longest serving volunteer
17 June 2015

VOLUNTEER Paul Ridley and The Floyd Unit Volunteer Team, have both won Volunteer of the Year awards at the Pennine Acute Trust’s second Volunteer Appreciation Event held last night (Tuesday 16th June).

Patricia Wild (pictured right), volunteer with The Oldham Hospital League of Friends, was named as the longest serving volunteer with a staggering 43 years service.

The Royal Oldham Hospital League of Friends strives to make the lives of patients and visitors to The Royal Oldham Hospital a much better experience.

The winners were announced at a fun packed evening event at Chadderton Town Hall which included a buffet, raffle and speakers from across the Trust. A cheque for £3,300 was also presented to the Trust from national not for profit organisation Pure Innovations

Paul (pictured left) was recognised for volunteering as a feeding assistant each week over the last 18 months. He supports nursing staff by assisting with a meal and drinks service and assisting patients with eating and drinking as appropriate.

He was praised for being a “valued member of the team,” and for “providing an additional pair of hands at mealtimes.”

 

 

The Floyd Unit Volunteer Team (pictured right) from Birch Hill Hospital was praised for providing a “triple star volunteer service” to patients on the Floyd Unit, who often have a neurological disability, which may have occurred as a result of an accident or injury, or who require stroke rehabilitation. The team of volunteers provide entertainment and stimulation for patients in the form of a film night and bingo sessions. There is also a “Pets as Therapy” session held every fortnight with Maverick the Golden Retriever.

John Jesky, chairman at The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said:

“We continue to have a huge army of volunteers supporting the Trust with nearly 900 active volunteers. We are really proud of this and are truly privileged to have so many people offering their support. I would like to say thank you to each and every one of them for their inspiring dedication and the tremendous example they set.”

The work carried out by volunteers at the Trust’s hospitals and community services is varied, with 40 different roles ranging from welcoming patients to hospitals, helping staff in busy clinics, helping on the wards, transporting patients around large hospital sites and even helping in theatres.

Speakers on the night included Mary Sunderland, volunteer co-ordinator, Kimberley Salmon-Jamieson, deputy chief nurse, John Hall, chaplaincy co-ordinator, Shirley Naylor, clinical audit co-ordinator, Pam Miller, deputy director of estates and facilities and Christine Booth, Pat Stajniak and Helen Bailey, volunteers from within the Accident & Emergency Department. All talked about the positive impact volunteers have on the services the Trust provides.