Pennine Acute Trust shortlisted in Nursing Times Awards 2014

Dr Val Finigan
Pennine Acute Trust shortlisted in Nursing Times Awards 2014
11 August 2014

A clinic set up to support mums who are struggling to breastfeed their tongue-tie babies has been shortlisted to receive a prestigious health care industry award.

The one stop shop service provided by The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust helps mums with feeding challenges and can arrange for a frenulotomy operation to be performed on tongue-tie babies under six months of age.

Research shows that breastfeeding is important to a baby’s health, preventing infections, allergies and obesity. Breastfeeding is also good for a mum’s health, reducing breast and ovarian cancers, uterine inertia and osteoporosis.

The Nursing Times Awards 2014 take place on Wednesday 29th October 2014 at the Grosvenor House Hotel in London. The Trust has been shortlisted in the Child and Adolescent Services category for the tongue tie clinic. The Community Services Drop-In Leg Ulcer Clinic at North Manchester has also been shortlisted for the Nursing in the Community category.

Dr Val Finigan, consultant midwife at The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said:

“This tongue tie service means that mothers and babies can get their feeding problems resolved quickly. Mothers do not have to remain on the maternity wards because their tongue-tied babies are struggling to feed. Nor are they likely to stay on the Children's wards because of growth problems or prolonged jaundice due to poor milk transfer. Moreover, babies are less likely to be admitted for infections as breastfeeding is protective of their health.”

“This frees up hospital beds and improves health for both mum and baby, as both are having a more positive feeding experience and breastfeeding for longer.”

Pictured: Dr Val Finigan, consultant midwife at The Pennine Acute Hospitals NHS Trust.

NOTES TO EDITORS

Babies with tongue-tie sometimes struggle to breastfeed properly as they cannot extend their tongue properly. This can be painful for the mum and can result in nipple trauma and poor milk transfer. Mums experiencing these problems will often stop breastfeeding their baby earlier than they would have liked.

A recent infant feeding survey showed that nine out of ten mothers would have liked to continue breastfeeding if the right support was available (Renfrew et al, 2012).